Friday, January 27, 2023

New History Museum Exhibit Examines Hampton’s Role In Prohibition

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HAMPTON—On November 1, 1916, just four months before the U.S. Senate voted to join the efforts overseas in World War I, Virginia breweries and distilleries closed their doors as the state began an experiment in Prohibition. From that date until 1933, state inspectors and federal agents attempted to stem the flow of illicit alcohol to the public.

According to the Hampton History Museum, Hampton’s relationship mirrors Virginia’s as a whole, but Hampton’s prohibition story is also uniquely distinct in many unexpected ways. Its newest exhibit, “Teetotalers and Moonshiners, and Hampton’s Prohibition Story,” will tell some of those tales.

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